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Can I Sue My Employer for Workplace Discrimination?

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By Tristan
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Can I sue my employer for workplace discrimination

You may be able to sue your employer for workplace discrimination if you have been discriminated against on the basis of gender, race, age, religion, national origin, or other protected characteristics. This includes wrongful termination, denial of promotions or raises, harassment, and more.

If you have experienced employment discrimination, you should seek legal advice from an experienced labor lawyer. They can provide you with the information you need to file a discrimination lawsuit and recover compensation from your employer.

What are the Steps to File a Claim?

The first step is to file a charge of discrimination with either the federal government’s Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or your state agency. You can either do this in person at one of the EEOC’s offices or by mail.

Once you have filed a claim with the EEOC, they will investigate your case. They will interview witnesses and collect documents, and it can take as long as six months to complete the investigation. Once the EEOC has finished its investigation, it will notify you and your employer.

You will also receive a notice of rights to sue, which is a letter that gives you the authority to pursue your claim in court. It will also tell you the specific procedures for filing your claim with a court and what to expect in court.

What Are the Damages in a Workplace Discrimination Case?

In a discrimination suit, you can seek damages from your employer for your lost wages. You may also be entitled to compensation for the emotional distress you suffered as a result of your discrimination. You might also be able to recover attorney’s fees and costs.

What if My Employer Was Not the Direct Source of My Discrimination?

If you believe that your employer was not the direct source of your discrimination, you can still pursue a discrimination suit. This type of suit is known as a disparate impact case, and it typically involves circumstantial evidence that suggests the employer’s policy or practice negatively impacted your protected class.

This is often a difficult and confusing area of law, and hiring an experienced discrimination lawyer can help you successfully bring your case.

What happens if my employer refuses to settle my discrimination case?

If your employer refuses to settle your discrimination case, you can proceed to a jury trial. Your attorney will be able to present the evidence and arguments to the judge, who will decide whether your employer has been liable for the discrimination you’ve experienced.

What are the benefits of hiring an experienced employment attorney?

Our employment lawyers can explain the many benefits of working with an experienced discrimination lawyer. They can help you get the compensation you deserve for your case, including back pay, front pay, and liquidated damages. They can also help you recover your out-of-pocket expenses, such as therapy, lost wages, or the cost of searching for a new job.

When your employer tries to settle your discrimination case, they will almost certainly hire their own lawyers. The EEOC and other administrative agencies can also assist you with your case, but they have strict deadlines to follow.

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